‘For The Health Of It’ Immunization Protects All Of Us
Published: August 8th, 2016

CHENANGO COUNTY – In the United States, vaccines have greatly reduced infectious diseases that once routinely harmed or killed many infants, children, and adults. However, the viruses and bacteria that cause vaccine-preventable disease still exist and can cause illness in people who are not protected by vaccines. Every year, tens of thousands of Americans still suffer serious health problems, are hospitalized, and even die from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines. Protect your health and the health of your family. Make sure you and your loved ones are up-to-date on recommended vaccines.

Here’s why you shouldn’t wait: Many vaccine-preventable diseases are still common in the U.S. Those that are not common here are still found in other parts of the world, and can still be a threat. Some of these diseases are very contagious. Any of these diseases could be serious – even for healthy people. Certain people may be at higher risk for getting some diseases or having more serious illness if they were to get sick, like young children, older adults, and those with health conditions.

Between January and June 2014, there were over 500 cases of measles reported in the U.S., more than in the last 20 years. - In the decade before 1963 when a measles vaccine became available, nearly all U.S. children got measles by 15 years old. Each year, about 3 to 4 million people were infected, 400 to 500 people died, 48,000 were hospitalized, and 4,000 suffered from encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Thanks to widespread vaccination, measles was declared to be eliminated from the U.S. in 2000. However, measles is still common in many other countries and is brought into the U.S. by unvaccinated travelers who get it while abroad. Measles is very contagious and can cause serious illness. The best way to protect yourself and loved ones from measles is by getting vaccinated.

Vaccines are our best protection against a number of serious, and sometimes deadly, diseases. Every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other medical experts update vaccine recommendations for children, teens, and adults based on the latest research and evidence-based science on vaccine safety, effectiveness, and patterns of vaccine-preventable diseases.

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